Donald's Encyclopedia of Popular Music

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

JACKSON, Stonewall

(b 6 Nov. '32, Tabor City NC) One of the more genuine country singers of '50s--60s, his real name after great-great-grandfather, a general in the Confederate Army. Entertainer in US Navy; from '54 worked as farmer, carpenter, logger while saving for a trip to Nashville: had log-trucking company in Moultrie GA, drove to Nashville '56, signed songwriting contract with Wesley Rose, auditioned for Grand Ole Opry and was the only unknown in modern times (with no records at all) to get an Opry contract. With Columbia '57, first hit 'Life To Go' '58, then 'Waterloo' '59, no. 1 country, top ten pop '59. Distinctive rural voice that 'Nashville Sound' could not diminish. Had impressive string of hits '60s incl. 'Why I'm Walkin'' '60, 'A Wound Time Can't Erase' '62, 'B. J. The D.J.' '63, 'Don't Be Angry' '64, 'Help Stamp Out Loneliness' '67, 'Me And You And A Dog Named Boo' '71. Faded from charts mid-'70s; still popular with trad. country fans.